Recently in economic stimulus Category

April 28, 2008

Use Your Tax Rebate to File Bankruptcy

On January 23, I wrote in this blog that people ought to use their rebate check to file bankruptcy. I pointed out that past attempts to stimulate the economy in this manner had pretty much failed, due to the fact that people used the money to pay down their debt, and that this time the loan sharks would gobble up most of the government's gifts hook, line, and sinker. In an April 25, 2008 Associated Press article by Tom Raum, President Bush is reported to have said the money would help Americans cope with rising gasoline and food prices, as well as aid a slumping economy. According to the article, Sen Charles Schumer (D. N.Y) responded: "It's galling to think that taxpayers' stimulus checks will be lining the pockets of OPEC. The sad truth is that the average American family will spend almost their entire stimulus check on higher gas prices this year." Let's say it like it is: George Bush (and, not so coincidentally, most of Congress) is giving their oil buddies a $150 billion tax rebate. It may be in your bank account for one brief moment, but it will quickly be recycled into the major oil companies' coffers. All of this takes place in the context of the worst housing slump since the depression, record foreclosure numbers, and a recession in many -- if not all -- states. My earlier proposal makes even more sense now. It will help folks who really need help and will serve to make our economy stronger. Everyone with significant debt (which is just about everyone) should use his or her rebate check to file for bankruptcy. The entire process can cost as little as $600 for people who represent themselves (which many currently do, with paperwork help from paralegals and targeted legal advice from lawyers). And even if you choose to hire a lawyer to represent you, the proposed rebates will definitely give you a good start on the fees, especially if you are married. Bankruptcy has been around since biblical times, and has long been recognized as an important component of the capitalist economy in that it restores debtors to the consumer marketplace. Specifically, bankruptcy gets rid of credit card and most other kinds of debt (exceptions are alimony and child support; most student loans; recent taxes; and debts caused by fraudulent or willful and malicious actions). Most people are solvent for the first time in years when they emerge from bankruptcy, and once again are able purchase goods and services without going into more debt. Just imagine how the economy would hum if consumers were freed from the punishing interest rates that often creep over 30% for technical violations of credit contracts. By filing bankruptcy, people will use their government checks to improve their own balance sheet, instead of donating their money to the oil companies and the fat cats who use the large credit corporations to bleed us dry. While it's true that mass bankruptcy filings would tighten rather than loosen consumer credit, it can't get much tighter. Anyway, it's not a bad idea for us to break our national addiction to debt and learn to pay as we go.

To learn more about using bankruptcy laws effectively, see The New Bankruptcy: Will It Work for You?, by Stephen Elias (Nolo).

January 23, 2008

Use Your Economic Stimulus Check to File Bankruptcy and Help the Economy

Just about everyone in and out of government is talking about putting cash in the hands of consumers to stimulate the economy. The only real points of disagreement seem to be which consumers and how much. The President wants to rebate taxes to the people who make enough money to pay taxes--the middle- and upper-classes, by definition. Democrats want people who are too poor to pay taxes to also get a piece of the action. The idea, of course, is that the recipients of this largess will kick-start the economy by immediately spending the money on consumer goods and services--appliances, cars, clothing, vacations.

The last time the government sent checks to people to help out the economy was in 2001, and many recipients used the money to pay down their debt and keep the collection agency wolves from their doors. This time around, the national consumer debt has more than doubled--and it is even more likely that the loan sharks will gobble up most of the government's gifts hook, line, and sinker. Maybe increasing the government debt by $100 billion in order to fatten the credit card and consumer finance companies will put some more credit in consumers' hands--just what we don't need--but if we follow President Bush's lead, the folks who own the finance industries will be the ones who ultimately benefit.

Here is a modest proposal that will help folks who really need help as well as make our economy stronger: Everyone with significant credit card debt (which is just about everyone) should use his or her check to file for bankruptcy. The entire process can cost as little as $600 for people who represent themselves (which many currently do, with paperwork help from paralegals and targeted legal advice from lawyers). And even if you choose to hire a lawyer to represent you, the proposed rebates will definitely get you started.

Bankruptcy has been around since biblical times, and has long been recognized as an important component of the capitalist economy in that it restores debtors to the consumer marketplace. Specifically, bankruptcy gets rid of credit card and most other kinds of debt (exceptions are alimony and child support; most student loans; recent taxes; and debts caused by fraudulent or willful and malicious actions). Most people are solvent for the first time in years when they emerge from bankruptcy, and once again are able purchase goods and services without going into more debt. Just imagine how the economy would hum if consumers were freed from the punishing interest rates that often creep over 30% for technical violations of credit contracts.

By filing bankruptcy, people will use their government checks to improve their own balance sheet, instead of donating their money to the fat cats who use the large credit corporations to bleed us dry. While it's true that mass bankruptcy filings would tighten rather than loosen consumer credit, it's not a bad idea for us to break our national addiction to debt and learn to pay as we go.

January 21, 2008

Amend Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Law to Allow Modifications of Mortgages

Proposals for dealing with the foreclosure crisis frequently include allowing bankruptcy judges in Chapter 13 cases to modify residential mortgages to bring them in line with the actual value of the debtors' homes, and, where appropriate, reduce the interest rate. This would often result in substantially reduced mortgage payments. At present, only non-residential mortgages can be modified in Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

While this approach to mortgage-debt relief seems helpful on the surface, it has one important flaw. A large number of people facing foreclosure are unable to propose feasible Chapter 13 plans that would be a prerequisite for the proposed relief. Proposals for mortgage debt relief in bankruptcy should include Chapter 7 bankruptcy as well as Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

It of course makes sense to use Chapter 13 as the vehicle for residential mortgage modifications -- Chapter 13 already allows for modification of other types of secured debts, and provides for amortization of mortgage arrears over the life of the plan. However, to extend the relief to the many debtors who can't use Chapter 13, Chapter 7 bankruptcy judges should also be authorized to modify mortgages and interest rates, and fold any arrearages into the newly modified mortgages. This will permit debtors to emerge from Chapter 7 with their home ownership intact, and reap the benefits of lower mortgage payments as part of their fresh start.

Not every person or family would be eligible for this relief. The bankruptcy judge would determine whether the debtor could afford the modified mortgage after bankruptcy. This determination would be based on the debtor's income, income history, and other expenses. If the judge decides that the mortgage would cause the debtor undue hardship or interfere with the debtor's fresh start, the mortgage would remain as is, and the creditor would be given a green light to proceed with the foreclosure. Importantly, this is the same procedure as is already used in in Chapter 7 "discharge hearings" when self-represented debtors seek to reaffirm car notes and other secured debts.

Perhaps using Chapter 7 as well as Chapter 13 bankruptcy for mortgage modifications doesn't go far enough. Maybe a special federal court procedure should be set up where anyone facing foreclosure can apply for relief without having to file any type of bankruptcy. There may be constitutional impediments to modifying mortgages outside of bankruptcy, but, if not, it would be wonderful to have a universal procedure for residential mortgage relief, at least from the standpoint of the millions of borrowers subject to predatory loans and flat-out unaffordable mortgages.